Tour Name:  Goa Tour
                                        Duration Tour: 06 days/05 nights

                                                                                   


Tourist Places: Delhi - Goa.
Detailed information about this Tourist Package.

DAY O1: DELHI  
Arrive Delhi: On arrival at the Delhi International Airport you will be welcomed and greeted with flowers by our Tour Representative. Transfer to your hotel. Overnight stay at the hotel in Delhi.

DAY O2: DELHI - GOA   (By flight / 2:40 Min)
Morning breakfast in hotel & proceed to city tour of Old Delhi and New Delhi visiting Raj Ghat and Shanti Van - the cremation sites of Mahatma Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru, Jama Masjid and drive past Red Fort and Chandni Chowk. Afternoon visit Qutub Minar built by Qutub-ud-Din Aibek in 1199, Humayun's Tomb, India Gate (War Memorial Arch), Lakshminarayan Temple - a modern Hindu Temple. Also drive past President's House, Parliament House, Akshardham Temple. 
An evening you will be transferred to the airport to catch the flight to Goa, On arrival transfer to hotel. The Rest of the day free to relax to the beach. Overnight stay at the hotel in Goa.


DAY O3: GOA 
Breakfast at the hotel and then explores the North Goa & South Goa. Visit Fishing village: Fishing villages are part of Goa’s rich cultural heritage. Local Goain fishing village is created on the grounds of the hotel, forming a perfect backdrop for a charming evening in a very rustic atmosphere. Artisans display their skills whilst the village dancers whirl to the music of a local band. After visit the Goa State Museum, Patto Panjim, Church of Our Lady of Immaculate Conception one of the first churches to be built in Goa, the Secretariat Building Panjim, Abbe Faria Statue Panjim, The Azad Maidan, Institute Menezes - Braganza and Central Library Panjim the view of the river Mandovi will enchant you with its beauty, the famous Shree Mahalaxmi Temple, Then, take a Sunset Cruise and watch the sun set: Traditional Folk Dances and Lively Goan Band and dance. Overnight stay at the hotel in Goa.

DAY O4: GOA 
Breakfast at hotel. The day is free to relax on Beach. In the evening, enjoy Sea food Bar-be-cue on the beach - Dine under a starlit sky on succulent lobsters, jumbo prawns and other local seafood delicacies which form part of a delightful bar-be-cue set up on a lovely stretch of the Goain beach. Guests may also cook their own food on skewers over a camp fire. A local musician captures the magic of the moment on his guitar strings. Overnight stay at the hotel in Goa.

DAY 05:  GOA - DELHI  (By flight / 2:40 Min)
After Morning breakfast at Goa airport upon arrival in Delhi. The evening is free at leisure. Later transfer to Delhi International Airport to board the flight for onward destination.


Above Tour Cost Include: 
Accommodation twin & double sharing Basis as per program. Daily breakfast & dinner at the hotel. All transportation by AC Deluxe Car Latest Model vehicle throughout the Tour. Services of our Assistance Representative for Airport Transfer as per the program. Services of English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Polish, Japanese, Chinese speaking Guides as per the itinerary. Mineral Water. Quote inclusive of presently applicable Government service taxes. 

Above Tour Cost Does Not Include: International flight.
Medical and insurance of any kind, Monument entrance fee. Any expenses arising out of unforeseen circumstances like flight delay/cancellation/hike in fair, strike or any other natural calamities. Personal nature Expenses i.e. Telephone Calls, laundry, Soft/hard drink, Meals, Tipping etc.


About Goa

Goa is visited by large numbers of international and domestic tourists each year for its white sand beaches, nightlife, places of worship and World Heritage-listed architecture. It has rich flora and fauna, owing to its location on the Western Ghats range, a biodiversity hotspot. Panaji is the state's capital, while Vasco da Gama is its largest city. The historic city of Margao still exhibits the cultural influence of the Portuguese, who first landed in the early 16th century as merchants and conquered it soon thereafter. Goa is a former Portuguese province; the Portuguese overseas territory of Portuguese India existed for about 450 years until it was annexed by India in 1961.


​Goa is a state on the southwestern coast of India within the region known as the Konkan, separated from the Deccan highlands of the state of Karnataka by the Western Ghats. It is bounded by Maharashtra to the north and Karnataka to the east and south, with the Arabian Sea forming its western coast. It is India's smallest stateby area and the fourth-smallest by population. Goa has the highest GDP per capita among all Indian states, two and a half times that of the country. It was ranked the best-placed state by the Eleventh Finance Commission for its infrastructure and ranked on top for the best quality of life in India by the National Commission on Population based on the 12 Indicators.


History of Goa 

Rock art engravings found in Goa exhibit the earliest traces of human life in India. Goa, situated within the Shimoga-Goa Greenstone Belt in the Western Ghats (an area composed of metavolcanics, iron formations and ferruginous quartzite), yields evidence for Acheulean occupation. Rock art engravings (petroglyphs) are present on laterite platforms and granite boulders in Usgalimal near the west flowing Kushavati river and in Kajur. In Kajur, the rock engravings of animals, tectiforms and other designs in granite have been associated with what is considered to be a megalithic stone circle with a round granite stone in the centre. Petroglyphs, cones, stone-axe, and choppers dating to 10,000 years ago have been found in various locations in Goa, including Kazur, Mauxim, and the Mandovi-Zuari basin. Evidence of Palaeolithic life is visible at Dabolim, Adkon, Shigao, Fatorpa, Arli, Maulinguinim, Diwar, Sanguem, Pilerne, and Aquem-Margaon. Difficulty in carbon dating the laterite rock compounds poses a problem for determining the exact time period. Early Goan society underwent radical change when Indo-Aryan and Dravidian migrants amalgamated with the aboriginal locals, forming the base of early Goan culture.

In the 3rd century BC, Goa was part of the Maurya Empire, ruled by the Buddhist emperor, Ashoka of Magadha. Buddhist monks laid the foundation of Buddhism in Goa. Between the 2nd century BC and the 6th century AD, Goa was ruled by the Bhojas of Goa. Chutus of Karwar also ruled some parts as feudatories of the Satavahanas of Kolhapur (2nd century BC to the 2nd century AD), Western Kshatrapas (around 150 AD), the Abhiras of Western Maharashtra, Bhojas of the Yadav clans of Gujarat, and the Konkan Mauryas as feudatories of the Kalachuris. The rule later passed to the Chalukyas of Badami, who controlled it between 578 and 753, and later the Rashtrakutas of Malkhed from 753 to 963. From 765 to 1015, the Southern Silharas of Konkan ruled Goa as the feudatories of the Chalukyas and the Rashtrakutas. Over the next few centuries, Goa was successively ruled by the Kadambas as the feudatories of the Chalukyas of Kalyani. They patronised Jainism in Goa.

In 1312, Goa came under the governance of the Delhi Sultanate. The kingdom's grip on the region was weak, and by 1370 it was forced to surrender it to Harihara I of the Vijayanagara empire. The Vijayanagara monarchs held on to the territory until 1469, when it was appropriated by the Bahmani sultans of Gulbarga. After that dynasty crumbled, the area fell into the hands of the Adil Shahis of Bijapur, who established as their auxiliary capital the city known under the Portuguese as Velha Goa(or Old Goa). The Mahadev Temple, attributed to the Kadambas of Goa; in what is today Bhagwan Mahaveer Sanctuary and Mollem National Park. Gold coins issued by the Kadamba king of Goa, Shivachitta  Paramadideva. Circa 1147–1187 CE.The Se Cathedral at Old Goa, an example of Portuguese architecture and one of the largest churches in Asia.

After India gained independence from the British in 1947, India requested that Portuguese territories on the Indian subcontinent be ceded to India. Portugal refused to negotiate on the sovereignty of its Indian enclaves. On 19 December 1961, the Indian Army invaded with Operation Vijay resulting in the annexation of Goa, and of Daman and Diu islands into the Indian union. Goa, along with Daman and Diu, was organised as a centrally administered union territory of India. On 30 May 1987, the union territory was split, and Goa was made India's twenty-fifth state, with Daman and Diu remaining a union territory. In 1510, the Portuguese defeated the ruling Bijapur sultan Yusuf Adil Shah with the help of a local ally, Timayya. They set up a permanent settlement in Velha Goa. This was the beginning of Portuguese rule in Goa that would last for four and a half centuries, until its annexation in 1961. The Goa Inquisition, a formal tribunal, was established in 1560, and was finally abolished in 1812. In 1843 the Portuguese moved the capital to Panaji from Velha Goa. By the mid-18th century, Portuguese Goa had expanded to most of the present-day state limits. Simultaneously the Portuguese lost other possessions in India until their borders stabilised and formed the Estado da Índia Portuguesa or State of Portuguese India.


Geography of Goa

Goa encompasses an area of 3,702 km2 (1,429 sq mi). It lies between the latitudes 14°53′54″ N and 15°40′00″ N and longitudes 73°40′33″ E and 74°20′13″ E.

Goa is a part of the coastal country known as the Konkan, which is an escarpment rising up to the Western Ghats range of mountains, which separate it from the Deccan Plateau. The highest point is the Sonsogor, with an altitude of 1,167 metres (3,829 ft). Goa has a coastline of 160 km (99 mi).

Goa's seven major rivers are the Zuari, Mandovi, Terekhol, Chapora, Galgibag, Kumbarjua canal, Talpona and the Sal. The Zuari and the Mandovi are the most important rivers, interspaced by the Kumbarjua canal, forming a major estuarine complex. These rivers are fed by the Southwest monsoon rain and their basin covers 69% of the state's geographical area.[25] These rivers are some of the busiest in India. Goa has more than 40 estuarine, eight marine, and about 90 riverine islands. The total navigable length of Goa's rivers is 253 km (157 mi). Goa has more than 300 ancient water-tanks built during the rule of the Kadamba dynasty and over 100 medicinal springs.

The Mormugao harbour on the mouth of the River Zuari is one of the best natural harbours in South Asia.

Most of Goa's soil cover is made up of laterites rich in ferric-aluminium oxides and reddish in colour. Further inland and along the riverbanks, the soil is mostly alluvial and loamy. The soil is rich in minerals and humus, thus conducive to agriculture. Some of the oldest rocks in the Indian subcontinent are found in Goa between Molem and Anmod on Goa's border with Karnataka. The rocks are classified as Trondjemeitic Gneissestimated to be 3,600 million years old, dated by rubidium isotope dating. A specimen of the rock is exhibited at Goa University. 


​Flora and Fauna of goa

Equatorial forest cover in Goa stands at 1,424 km2 (549.81 sq mi), most of which is owned by the government. Government-owned forest is estimated at 1,224.38 km2 (472.74 sq mi) whilst private is given as 200 km2 (77.22 sq mi). Most of the forests in the state are located in the interior eastern regions of the state. The Western Ghats, which form most of eastern Goa, have been internationally recognised as one of the biodiversity hotspots of the world. In the February 1999 issue of National Geographic Magazine, Goa was compared with the Amazon and the Congo basins for its rich tropical biodiversity. Goa's wildlife sanctuaries boast of more than 1512 documented species of plants, over 275 species of birds, over 48 kinds of animals and over 60 genera of reptiles. Goa is also known for its coconut cultivation. The coconut tree has been reclassified by the government as a palm (like a grass), enabling farmers and real estate developers to clear land with fewer restrictions.

Rice is the main food crop, and pulses (legume), Ragi (Finger Millet) and other food crops are also grown. Main cash crops are coconut, cashewnut, arecanut, sugarcane and fruits like pineapple, mango and banana. Goa's state animal is the Gaur, the state bird is the Ruby Throated Yellow Bulbul, which is a variation of Black-crested Bulbul, and the state tree is the Matti (Asna). The important forests products are bamboo canes, Maratha barks, chillar barks and the bhirand. Coconut trees are ubiquitous and are present in almost all areas of Goa barring the elevated regions. A large number of deciduous trees, such as teak, Sal tree, cashew and mango trees are present. Fruits include jackfruit, mango, pineapple and "black-berry" ("podkoam" in Konkani language). Goa's forests are rich with medicinal plants. Rice paddies are common in rural Goa.

Foxes, wild boar and migratory birds are found in the jungles of Goa. The avifauna (bird species) includes kingfisher, myna and parrot. Numerous types of fish are also caught off the coast of Goa and in its rivers. Crab, lobster, shrimp, jellyfish, oysters and catfish are the basis of the marine fishery. Goa also has a high snake population. Goa has many famous "National Parks", including the renowned Salim Ali Bird Sanctuary on the island of Chorão. Other wildlife sanctuaries include the Bondla Wildlife Sanctuary, Molem Wildlife Sanctuary, Cotigao Wildlife Sanctuary, Madei Wildlife Sanctuary, Netravali Wildlife Sanctuary, and Mahaveer Wildlife Sanctuary. Goa has more than 33% of its geographic area under government forests (1224.38 km²) of which about 62% has been brought under Protected Areas (PA) of Wildlife Sanctuaries and National Park. Since there is a substantial area under private forests and a large tract under cashew, mango, coconut, etc. plantations, the total forest and tree cover constitutes 56.6% of the geographic area.






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